motionaddicts:

Insulated

motionaddicts:

Insulated

Montreal // Bahamas

Troubled Tracks // Cowboy and Indian

kevintullyandallhisfriends:

Obedient Cat Comic Three

kevintullyandallhisfriends:

Obedient Cat Comic Three

If I Needed You (Townes Van Zandt cover) // Leif Vollebekk

This is heartbreaking and beautiful. What a great rendition.

skiphursh:

Skip Dolphin Hurshwww.skiphursh.com

skiphursh:

Skip Dolphin Hursh
www.skiphursh.com

rebeccamock:

The Clipper
A small, quick painting I made originally as part of a series for SPX. A bunch of stuff came up in recent weeks, so…. it looks like this finished print is all there is of that series. But exciting things are in store for the future! I’ve been doing a lot of research on tall ships lately. If you want to learn more about maritime topics or my upcoming GN Four Points, come find me at SPX. :)

rebeccamock:

The Clipper

A small, quick painting I made originally as part of a series for SPX. A bunch of stuff came up in recent weeks, so…. it looks like this finished print is all there is of that series. But exciting things are in store for the future!
I’ve been doing a lot of research on tall ships lately. If you want to learn more about maritime topics or my upcoming GN Four Points, come find me at SPX. :)

weirdwiki:


Phantom vibration syndrome or phantom ringing is the sensation and false belief that one can feel one’s mobile phone vibrating or hear it ringing, when in fact the telephone is not doing so.
Other terms for this concept include ringxiety (a portmanteau of ring and anxiety), hypovibrochondria (a mix of hypochondria and vibro) and fauxcellarm (a play on “false alarm”).
Phantom ringing may be experienced while taking a shower, watching television, or using a noisy device. Humans are particularly sensitive to auditory tones between 1,000 and 6,000 hertz, and basic mobile phone ringers often fall within this range. This frequency range can generally be more difficult to locate spatially, thus allowing for potential confusion when heard from a distance. False vibrations are less well understood however, and could have psychological or neurological sources.

Phantom vibration syndrome

weirdwiki:

Phantom vibration syndrome or phantom ringing is the sensation and false belief that one can feel one’s mobile phone vibrating or hear it ringing, when in fact the telephone is not doing so.

Other terms for this concept include ringxiety (a portmanteau of ring and anxiety), hypovibrochondria (a mix of hypochondria and vibro) and fauxcellarm (a play on “false alarm”).

Phantom ringing may be experienced while taking a shower, watching television, or using a noisy device. Humans are particularly sensitive to auditory tones between 1,000 and 6,000 hertz, and basic mobile phone ringers often fall within this range. This frequency range can generally be more difficult to locate spatially, thus allowing for potential confusion when heard from a distance. False vibrations are less well understood however, and could have psychological or neurological sources.

Phantom vibration syndrome

beesandbombs:

circle wave

beesandbombs:

circle wave